Snow Guards for Residential Construction: The Do’s, the Don’ts and the Dilemma

To those of you who’ve been following/reading my blogs, thank you. Over the course of the next several postings, I’m confident that as a reader, you’ll begin to understand that the snow management industry, although hundreds of years old in practice, is in many ways still in its infancy. Today we face many of the same issues as we did 100+ years ago (I won’t quote READ THE REST….

Summary: Snow Guard Evolution (so far)

Over the course of multiple blogs, I’ve shared my opinion about the history and evolution of snow guards, as both the roofing industry and new technology have dictated. As I write and reread these postings, there are several underlying themes. One theme is that, in our quest to find better solutions to problems, change is constant. This is a good thing – when all goes well. READ THE REST….

Snow Guard Evolution During the Early 1990’s

As we enter the early 1990’s, we can skip over talking about things like the mullet, 90210, grunge bands and big bangs. Instead, let’s focus on a variety of snow guard options that began to enter the market right around this time. Seemingly the most active of these markets in the 1990’s was standing seam metal roofing. In an earlier blog from this past summer, I READ THE REST….

The Significance of Snow Guard Layout: Pipe-Style

In my last blog I talked about the significance and importance of layout for pad-style snow guards. In short, we’ve found through trial and error that pad-style snow guards that are evenly distributed over the entire roof surface do a better job of allowing snow and ice to melt in place than individual tiers of snow guards with open roof space between them. Picture a composition READ THE REST….

The Significance of Snow Guard Layout: Pad-Style

The layout of snow guards has always been a highly-debated topic – one that’s continually being studied. An ASTM committee has been formed to develop a testing standard to determine what a snow guard is and what it does physically (meaning that when tested for shear and pullout loads, what will a given snow guard device resist?) Why is this such a highly-debated topic?  Because the READ THE REST….

5 Common Snow Guard Questions Answered

As I’ve come to learn, people have many questions when it comes to managing rooftop snow. As I’ve also come to learn, the answers to those questions aren’t as cut-and-dry as you would think, with many variables playing into the mix. With every project being different in terms of roof type, location, snow load, eave length, roof slope, snow management needs or expectations, etc., etc., etc. READ THE REST….

3 Reasons Alpine’s AIA/CES Course is Right for You

We have some VERY exciting news to share here at Alpine SnowGuards. You may have already heard. Or, maybe you haven’t heard. Either way, it’s worth repeating…. Alpine has recently become an AIA-approved Continuing Education Systems Provider! What does this mean? It means that by being an approved AIA/CES Provider, we’re presented with the unique opportunity to serve the global specifying community with educational information, which READ THE REST….

Avoid Gutter Damage with Snow Guards

There are those areas of buildings that most of us don’t think about all that often. That is, until we have to. One of those areas is the gutters that are in place to carry rain water away from the building. Constant dampness in a basement or on top of a slab foundation can cause odors, decaying or deformed wood, peeling paint and even mold or mildew READ THE REST….

Which Snow Guard is Right for My Project?

Let’s assume you’ve read my blog about the difference between pad-style snow guards (deterrent) and pipe-style snow guards (barricade). These previous posts are available on the Alpine SnowGuards website to help you determine which snow guard is right for your project. In the past, I’ve used the famous Frank Lloyd Wright approach to architecture design: Form Follows Function. It starts with an understanding of the problem. READ THE REST….

Snow Guard Evolution During the Me Decade (1971-1980): Part 2

As I mentioned in my previous blog, the roofing industry of the late 1970’s was beginning to mimic that of the late 1800’s. Slate, tile and metal roofing (traditional or hard roofing materials) began a renaissance….what an interesting time this must have been. There were a handful of roofing companies who were still installing these traditional products and I think it’s safe to say that the READ THE REST….